10 Things you can expect from your British walking holiday

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Culture alert! It’s too easy when living somewhere to forget that your country has a culture. Living in your own culture makes you forget its there in the first place, however, guests from afar will notice the nuances and quirks which make your visit that extra special.

Heres what to expect

1. We are a nostalgic bunch

Nostalgia has always been in fashion, but with such a long and rich history behind us, we are a nostalgic people who love nothing more than to talk about yesteryear and rave about a time long gone. Enjoy our vintage tea shops, virtually untouched pubs and many folk riding around on vintage bikes.

2. You have to say hello to everyone

This will probably drive you a little crazy but when your walking, it’s kinda rude to not say hi to passers-by. It’s just what us Brits do! Of course if theres a large group walking past, you can simply say hello to them collectively. Expect almost everyone you pass to greet you in some form.

3. Weather is our conversation sta6. rter

We love to chat weather. It’s often a bit mixed so that gives us loads to talk about. Last summers weather also comes into the conversation a lot, and expect to hear a few opinions about global warming. After all, this sunny day surely is a sign of things to come…

4. We like tea

We love tea, but we don’t really talk about it a lot, it’s not a particularly interesting conversation. However, we enjoy drinking a lot of it. For reference, you make a tea by putting your teabag in the mug, filling it with boiling water, walking away for a few minutes, squeezing the teabag out, then putting in milk to taste.

Never put milk in first. That’s a naughty no-no.

5. We love to hate queuing but do it anyway

Don’t push in, it’s rude.

6. We apologize, a lot

“Sorry, can I help you with that?”

“Sorry, can you say that again, I couldn’t hear you properly.”

“Sorry, can I borrow you for a moment, I need help with something.”

“Sorry, I’m a little lost, do you know where the trail is from here.”

You get the picture, we like to say sorry a lot. The trouble is, I’m not sure we really are.

7. We use miles

Good luck with this one. We track distances in miles, however, the grids on our maps are in Kilometers. Ask for direction and prepare to be baffled.

8. English breakfasts get a little boring, but we don’t admit that

After 8 days of a Full English each morning you will be glad for something else. After all, our national breakfast is really a load of fried food, placed on a plate and mopped up with a bit of bread.

9. Our humor is perhaps a little confusing

We thrive on sarcasm and dry humor. It can take a bit of getting used to but once you have mastered ‘sarcasm’ you will fit right in.

10. You may not not understand English

Depending who you’re talking to and which part of Britain your visiting, you may not understand everyone. There are a lot of regional accents, some of which are very strong and hard for those, whos first tounge is not English to understand.

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Matthew Usherwood

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